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A big band in a small-ish room: Green Day brings 'Revolution Radio' to the Palladium

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  • Oct 19
    A big band in a small-ish room: Green Day brings 'Revolution Radio' to the Palladium

    Billie Joe Armstrong had a head full of memories when his long-running punk band, Green Day, played the Palladium in Hollywood on Monday night.

    Not long into the show, the singer brandished a baby-blue electric guitar and told the crowd his mother had bought it for him for $300 when he was 10 years old.

    “She’s sitting right up there,” he added, pointing proudly to the balcony.

    He also recalled the last time he performed at the Palladium, as an opening act for Bad Religion in the early 1990s — shortly before Green Day’s album “Dookie” came out and launched the Berkeley group toward the arenas and stadiums it fills now.

    These Rock and Roll Hall of Famers had returned to a relatively cozy concert hall as part of the rollout of their new album, “Revolution Radio,” which they’ve described as a back-to-basics effort after years of ambitious experimentation.

    Released this month, it’s the band’s first record since 2000 not to carry an overarching concept, be it the rock-opera storytelling of 2004’s “American Idiot” (which later became a hit Broadway musical) or the triple-album sprawl of “¡Uno!,” “¡Dos!” and “¡Tré!” in 2012.

    In contrast with those discs, “Revolution Radio” emphasizes fuzzy guitars and punchy choruses over stylistic variety or character development. And to drive home the old-school vibe, the trio — which also features bassist Mike Dirnt and drummer Tré Cool — booked a swing through the kinds of venues it outgrew long ago.

    Full review at LA TImes: HERE

Brian's picture
on October 19, 2016 - 12:23pm

Billie Joe Armstrong had a head full of memories when his long-running punk band, Green Day, played the Palladium in Hollywood on Monday night.

Not long into the show, the singer brandished a baby-blue electric guitar and told the crowd his mother had bought it for him for $300 when he was 10 years old.

“She’s sitting right up there,” he added, pointing proudly to the balcony.

He also recalled the last time he performed at the Palladium, as an opening act for Bad Religion in the early 1990s — shortly before Green Day’s album “Dookie” came out and launched the Berkeley group toward the arenas and stadiums it fills now.

These Rock and Roll Hall of Famers had returned to a relatively cozy concert hall as part of the rollout of their new album, “Revolution Radio,” which they’ve described as a back-to-basics effort after years of ambitious experimentation.

Released this month, it’s the band’s first record since 2000 not to carry an overarching concept, be it the rock-opera storytelling of 2004’s “American Idiot” (which later became a hit Broadway musical) or the triple-album sprawl of “¡Uno!,” “¡Dos!” and “¡Tré!” in 2012.

In contrast with those discs, “Revolution Radio” emphasizes fuzzy guitars and punchy choruses over stylistic variety or character development. And to drive home the old-school vibe, the trio — which also features bassist Mike Dirnt and drummer Tré Cool — booked a swing through the kinds of venues it outgrew long ago.

Full review at LA TImes: HERE

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