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Billie Joe Armstrong And Norah Jones Get Close: Listen on NPR NOW

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    Billie Joe Armstrong And Norah Jones Get Close: Listen on NPR NOW
    November 25, 2013

    Think of the album Foreverly as a musical equation. You start with Billie Joe Armstrong, lead singer of Green Day . Then you add Norah Jones. Then, you get these two very different musicians thinking about doing duets of music from a totally unexpected source: . Finally, substitute the hits that made those iconic siblings famous with something a touch more obscure.

    "I'm a big vinyl collector, so I was just flipping through the bins," Armstrong says of discovering Songs Our Daddy Taught Us, a lesser-known album of traditional tunes recorded by The Everly Brothers. "I thought it would be cool to remake the record. But I thought it would be cool to do it with a woman."

    Norah Jones was game for the challenge, if a little unsure how their voices would sound together — especially, she says, attempting the close two-part harmonies that are the Everlys' trademark. Once she and Armstrong got to the studio, one rule made all the difference.

    Listen at NPR: HERE

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Brian's picture
on November 25, 2013

Think of the album Foreverly as a musical equation. You start with Billie Joe Armstrong, lead singer of Green Day . Then you add Norah Jones. Then, you get these two very different musicians thinking about doing duets of music from a totally unexpected source: . Finally, substitute the hits that made those iconic siblings famous with something a touch more obscure.

"I'm a big vinyl collector, so I was just flipping through the bins," Armstrong says of discovering Songs Our Daddy Taught Us, a lesser-known album of traditional tunes recorded by The Everly Brothers. "I thought it would be cool to remake the record. But I thought it would be cool to do it with a woman."

Norah Jones was game for the challenge, if a little unsure how their voices would sound together — especially, she says, attempting the close two-part harmonies that are the Everlys' trademark. Once she and Armstrong got to the studio, one rule made all the difference.

Listen at NPR: HERE