Skip directly to content

GREEN DAY BRING THE POWER AT LOLLAPALOOZA

Blog


  • Brian's picture
    GREEN DAY BRING THE POWER AT LOLLAPALOOZA
    August 07, 2010

    Green Day, of course, pummeled, powered, and pulled out all the stops during their two-plus hour set, reaching deep into their expansive back catalog and using every crowd-pleasing trick in the rock-band hat. And then they invented a few more stunts just for the sake of it. Seriously, if it weren't for the city of Chicago's noise ordinances, they'd probably still be at it.

    Bottle-blonde Billie Joe Armstrong bounded back and forth across the stage, led the crowd in countless sing-a-longs, pranced, danced, collapsed, rose again, and at one point, played a solo with his guitar behind his head. While standing on one leg. He pulled kids young and old from the crowd--letting them sing choruses (on "East Jesus Nowhere") or entire songs ("Longview," which was belted out by a kid who totally, completely killed it), assisting them in stage dives, or fire off water cannons. He shouted "Chicago!" more times than the entire Daley clan combined. He donned a feather boa. He mooned the crowd. He fired off T-shirt cannons and toilet paper guns. And at no point did he appear to even be the slightest bit tired.

    "They said they're gonna pull the plug on us at 10 ... I told them to kiss my f--king ass, we'll play for as long as we want," he shouted at one point.

    "You paid your hard-earned money to buy a ticket to tonight," he yelled later in the set. "It is my honor and my privilege to give you the best f---ing show you've ever seen in your life."

    And judging by the boundless energy displayed by his Green Day mates, he wasn't the only one feeling this way. Mike Dirnt scowled and strutted, always keeping his bass thuddingly precise. Tre Cool vamped it up on an extended version of the Isley Brother's "Shout" (while wearing a sun hat, horn-rimmed spectacles and a red brazier, it should be noted), and kept the back beat cracking. At this point, Green Day are a poundingly precise Rock and Roll machine, as evidenced by the covers they effortlessly worked into the set--everything from the opening riffs of Black Sabbath's "Iron Man," and the first verse of the Guns 'N Roses "Sweet Child O' Mine" to the chorus of the Beatles' "Hey Jude"--and the sheer spectacle of their show, an eye-popping, ear-splitting series of pyro bursts and fireworks explosions.
    [Full review at MTV]

    Filed under:
    0
Brian's picture
on August 07, 2010

Green Day, of course, pummeled, powered, and pulled out all the stops during their two-plus hour set, reaching deep into their expansive back catalog and using every crowd-pleasing trick in the rock-band hat. And then they invented a few more stunts just for the sake of it. Seriously, if it weren't for the city of Chicago's noise ordinances, they'd probably still be at it.

Bottle-blonde Billie Joe Armstrong bounded back and forth across the stage, led the crowd in countless sing-a-longs, pranced, danced, collapsed, rose again, and at one point, played a solo with his guitar behind his head. While standing on one leg. He pulled kids young and old from the crowd--letting them sing choruses (on "East Jesus Nowhere") or entire songs ("Longview," which was belted out by a kid who totally, completely killed it), assisting them in stage dives, or fire off water cannons. He shouted "Chicago!" more times than the entire Daley clan combined. He donned a feather boa. He mooned the crowd. He fired off T-shirt cannons and toilet paper guns. And at no point did he appear to even be the slightest bit tired.

"They said they're gonna pull the plug on us at 10 ... I told them to kiss my f--king ass, we'll play for as long as we want," he shouted at one point.

"You paid your hard-earned money to buy a ticket to tonight," he yelled later in the set. "It is my honor and my privilege to give you the best f---ing show you've ever seen in your life."

And judging by the boundless energy displayed by his Green Day mates, he wasn't the only one feeling this way. Mike Dirnt scowled and strutted, always keeping his bass thuddingly precise. Tre Cool vamped it up on an extended version of the Isley Brother's "Shout" (while wearing a sun hat, horn-rimmed spectacles and a red brazier, it should be noted), and kept the back beat cracking. At this point, Green Day are a poundingly precise Rock and Roll machine, as evidenced by the covers they effortlessly worked into the set--everything from the opening riffs of Black Sabbath's "Iron Man," and the first verse of the Guns 'N Roses "Sweet Child O' Mine" to the chorus of the Beatles' "Hey Jude"--and the sheer spectacle of their show, an eye-popping, ear-splitting series of pyro bursts and fireworks explosions.
[Full review at MTV]