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Green Day fires on all cylinders in politically charged show at Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre

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  • Aug 15
    Green Day fires on all cylinders in politically charged show at Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre

    A double dose of Green Day was just the right amount for St. Louis fans. The punk band brought its second tour in less than a year to town for a blood-rushing show Monday night at Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre.

    Green Day played a comparatively intimate show in October at the Pageant. The instantly sold-out club date coincided with the release of its “Revolution Radio” album.

    Several months later, after fans had a chance to get acquainted with the new music, the band was back, this time in front of 13,500 fans for its summer tour, larger in every way.

    If there was an overarching message, it was one of listening and understanding, stressed by frontman Billie Joe Armstrong when he addressed fans amid the band’s explosive sounds.

    At one point, during a take on Eric Idle’s “Always Look on the Bright Side of Life,” he reminded the audience that “we’re all brothers and sisters. I watch the news and get disgusted at what’s going on. I’m tired of it. I (expletive) hate Nazis. Some things are worth hating.”

    There was more where that came from during the mostly playful two-hour-plus concert that never disappointed.

    During “Holiday,” while cloaked in an American flag, Armstrong demanded “No racism. No sexism. No homophobia. No Donald Trump. This is America,” sentiments that went over well with the crowd.

    Continuing on this path, he called the evening “a night about a new America, about love and compassion and truth and no more lies, no more conspiracies. We’re leaving it all at the door.” He said the audience was made up of “freaks, strangers and weirdos” called there in the name of unity to sing, dance and cry together.

    Either you were with him or you weren’t. Green Day fans knew what they were getting and were definitely along for the ride.

    The band never forgot about the music along the way. Whether in a rare small setting or an amphitheater, Green Day consistently brings the heat, literally and figuratively. It did that here, with songs including the pumping opener “Know Your Enemy,” signature ballad “Good Riddance (Time of Your Life),” the epic “Jesus of Suburbia” and “American Idiot,” which featured flashing red, white and blue lighting.

    Anchored by singer-guitarist Armstrong, bassist Mike Dirnt and drummer Tre Cool, the band’s pyro-fueled show was an urgent flow of new songs from “Revolution Radio” including “Bang Bang,” “Still Breathing” and “Forever Now” mixed with classics such as “When I Come Around,” “Minority,” “Welcome to Paradise” and “Basket Case.”

    After 30 years in the game, Green Day still pops as if untouched by time, firing on all cylinders. Even when the band took its first breath from the fast pace of “Boulevard of Broken Dreams” and let the audience handle much of the vocals sing-along style, the momentum failed to slow. At the end of the song, Armstrong asked fans to put their cellphones away. “Why save something for later when you can experience it now?”

    He revisited cellphones at the beginning of “Are We the Waiting,” another mellow moment, when he asked for the house lights to be turned up. “I don’t wanna see your cellphones,” he said. “I wanna see your faces.”

    From the top, Armstrong kept things as interactive as possible, pulling a young woman onto the stage to sing “Know Your Enemy.” At the song’s end, she dove into the crowd. It’s the only way to exit Green Day’s stage.

    Full review at STL today: HERE

Brian's picture
on August 15, 2017 - 11:38pm

A double dose of Green Day was just the right amount for St. Louis fans. The punk band brought its second tour in less than a year to town for a blood-rushing show Monday night at Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre.

Green Day played a comparatively intimate show in October at the Pageant. The instantly sold-out club date coincided with the release of its “Revolution Radio” album.

Several months later, after fans had a chance to get acquainted with the new music, the band was back, this time in front of 13,500 fans for its summer tour, larger in every way.

If there was an overarching message, it was one of listening and understanding, stressed by frontman Billie Joe Armstrong when he addressed fans amid the band’s explosive sounds.

At one point, during a take on Eric Idle’s “Always Look on the Bright Side of Life,” he reminded the audience that “we’re all brothers and sisters. I watch the news and get disgusted at what’s going on. I’m tired of it. I (expletive) hate Nazis. Some things are worth hating.”

There was more where that came from during the mostly playful two-hour-plus concert that never disappointed.

During “Holiday,” while cloaked in an American flag, Armstrong demanded “No racism. No sexism. No homophobia. No Donald Trump. This is America,” sentiments that went over well with the crowd.

Continuing on this path, he called the evening “a night about a new America, about love and compassion and truth and no more lies, no more conspiracies. We’re leaving it all at the door.” He said the audience was made up of “freaks, strangers and weirdos” called there in the name of unity to sing, dance and cry together.

Either you were with him or you weren’t. Green Day fans knew what they were getting and were definitely along for the ride.

The band never forgot about the music along the way. Whether in a rare small setting or an amphitheater, Green Day consistently brings the heat, literally and figuratively. It did that here, with songs including the pumping opener “Know Your Enemy,” signature ballad “Good Riddance (Time of Your Life),” the epic “Jesus of Suburbia” and “American Idiot,” which featured flashing red, white and blue lighting.

Anchored by singer-guitarist Armstrong, bassist Mike Dirnt and drummer Tre Cool, the band’s pyro-fueled show was an urgent flow of new songs from “Revolution Radio” including “Bang Bang,” “Still Breathing” and “Forever Now” mixed with classics such as “When I Come Around,” “Minority,” “Welcome to Paradise” and “Basket Case.”

After 30 years in the game, Green Day still pops as if untouched by time, firing on all cylinders. Even when the band took its first breath from the fast pace of “Boulevard of Broken Dreams” and let the audience handle much of the vocals sing-along style, the momentum failed to slow. At the end of the song, Armstrong asked fans to put their cellphones away. “Why save something for later when you can experience it now?”

He revisited cellphones at the beginning of “Are We the Waiting,” another mellow moment, when he asked for the house lights to be turned up. “I don’t wanna see your cellphones,” he said. “I wanna see your faces.”

From the top, Armstrong kept things as interactive as possible, pulling a young woman onto the stage to sing “Know Your Enemy.” At the song’s end, she dove into the crowd. It’s the only way to exit Green Day’s stage.

Full review at STL today: HERE

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