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Kurt Cobain Remembered, 20 Years After His Death

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    Kurt Cobain Remembered, 20 Years After His Death
    April 08, 2014

    Kurt Cobain changed Win Butler's world. Billie Joe Armstrong thought the Nirvana frontman was his generation's John Lennon and Paul McCartney. And Beck thinks he owes a debt of gratitude to the singer-guitarist for opening the world's ears to a thriving, but little-heard underground scene.

    It's been two decades since Cobain took his own life on April 5, 1994, at age 27, yet he remains an important cultural touchstone for those he influenced and entertained in his short-lived career. The Associated Press spoke with a handful of musicians about their memories of Cobain as the anniversary of his suicide approached. Some knew him, some watched him from afar. All were touched in some way profound and unforgettable.

    Billie Joe Armstrong remembers being out on Green Day's first tour in 1990 and encountering the band's graffiti in a string of tiny clubs out West. He'd heard of Nirvana through its Sub Pop releases, including its debut album, "Bleach," but thought little of it at the time.

    A year later, Nirvana was known throughout the world. Cobain became something of a tortured poet laureate, a figure Armstrong thinks was as important for his generation as Lennon and McCartney were to theirs.

    "You know, the guy just wrote beautiful songs," Armstrong said. "When someone goes that honestly straight to the core of who they are, what they're feeling, and was able to kind of put it out there, I don't know, man, it's amazing. I remember hearing it when 'Nevermind' came out and just thinking, we've finally got our Beatles, this era finally got our Beatles, and ever since then it's never happened again. That's what's interesting. I was always thinking maybe the next 10 years. OK, maybe the next 10 years, OK, maybe. ... That was truly the last rock 'n' roll revolution."

    Full article at AP: HERE

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Brian's picture
on April 08, 2014

Kurt Cobain changed Win Butler's world. Billie Joe Armstrong thought the Nirvana frontman was his generation's John Lennon and Paul McCartney. And Beck thinks he owes a debt of gratitude to the singer-guitarist for opening the world's ears to a thriving, but little-heard underground scene.

It's been two decades since Cobain took his own life on April 5, 1994, at age 27, yet he remains an important cultural touchstone for those he influenced and entertained in his short-lived career. The Associated Press spoke with a handful of musicians about their memories of Cobain as the anniversary of his suicide approached. Some knew him, some watched him from afar. All were touched in some way profound and unforgettable.

Billie Joe Armstrong remembers being out on Green Day's first tour in 1990 and encountering the band's graffiti in a string of tiny clubs out West. He'd heard of Nirvana through its Sub Pop releases, including its debut album, "Bleach," but thought little of it at the time.

A year later, Nirvana was known throughout the world. Cobain became something of a tortured poet laureate, a figure Armstrong thinks was as important for his generation as Lennon and McCartney were to theirs.

"You know, the guy just wrote beautiful songs," Armstrong said. "When someone goes that honestly straight to the core of who they are, what they're feeling, and was able to kind of put it out there, I don't know, man, it's amazing. I remember hearing it when 'Nevermind' came out and just thinking, we've finally got our Beatles, this era finally got our Beatles, and ever since then it's never happened again. That's what's interesting. I was always thinking maybe the next 10 years. OK, maybe the next 10 years, OK, maybe. ... That was truly the last rock 'n' roll revolution."

Full article at AP: HERE

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