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    NEW YORK MAGAZINE
    November 22, 2010

    Green Day, My Chemical Romance, Pink Floyd, and Other Bands Whose Shelved Albums Remain Secret

    Green Day, Valentines and Cigarettes

    PROJECT: Following 2000’s tepidly received Warning,
    Green Day decided to return to its scaled-down roots, recording nearly
    twenty new songs (which, given Green Day’s early pop-punk metabolism
    rate, would have yielded an album about eleven minutes long). But the
    master tapes were stolen from the recording studio, prompting the band
    to start over again, a task that resulted in 2004’s American Idiot.

    SIGNS OF LIFE: For years, fans speculated that Green Day had been releasing Valentines
    tracks under the guise of the Network, the band’s New Wave side
    project. But the band members have always denied the charge, and the
    songs remained forever lost — until this summer, when Green Day
    recorded Valentines and Cigarettes’s title track for a forthcoming live album.

    ODDS OF EVENTUAL RELEASE: In its original form? 50 to 1. But we wouldn’t put it past the band to revisit those songs again in the near future.
     
    [Full article at New York Magazine]

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Brian's picture
on November 22, 2010

Green Day, My Chemical Romance, Pink Floyd, and Other Bands Whose Shelved Albums Remain Secret

Green Day, Valentines and Cigarettes

PROJECT: Following 2000’s tepidly received Warning,
Green Day decided to return to its scaled-down roots, recording nearly
twenty new songs (which, given Green Day’s early pop-punk metabolism
rate, would have yielded an album about eleven minutes long). But the
master tapes were stolen from the recording studio, prompting the band
to start over again, a task that resulted in 2004’s American Idiot.

SIGNS OF LIFE: For years, fans speculated that Green Day had been releasing Valentines
tracks under the guise of the Network, the band’s New Wave side
project. But the band members have always denied the charge, and the
songs remained forever lost — until this summer, when Green Day
recorded Valentines and Cigarettes’s title track for a forthcoming live album.

ODDS OF EVENTUAL RELEASE: In its original form? 50 to 1. But we wouldn’t put it past the band to revisit those songs again in the near future.
 
[Full article at New York Magazine]