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  • GREEN DAY
    Photographer: Sean Murphy
    Date: February 24, 2000
    Location: Berkeley, California

    Full list at Neatorama: HERE

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  • Green Day will forever hold a steadfast place in my heart, as their critically acclaimed seventh studio album, American Idiot, was the first CD I ever declared as my own. After some hefty amounts of incessant coaxing toward my mother, I found myself indubitably adrift within the vast expanse of the records’ soaring, yet angst-laden vocal patterns and radio-ready punk-rock infused instrumentals. American Idiot had me enthralled; it had me consumed; it had me in love.

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  • Please get in touch with the project’s lead archivist Daniel Hague at archive@eastbaypunk.com if you would like to contribute any archive materials to the film.
     

    In the mid 1980s, on the eastern shores of the San Francisco Bay, a fuse was lit. As the shadows of the 1960s counterculture gave way to the Reagan 80s, disillusioned kids growing up in Berkeley and its surrounding suburbs discovered punk rock... and each other. Together, with amplifiers, copy machines and hearts blazing, they fought to carve out a movement of their own, and changed music, art and literature forever.

    EAST BAY: By

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  • For more than two decades Chris Bilheimer has designed album covers, concert posters, rock T-shirts and more as art director for R.E.M. and freelancer for other bands, notably Green Day, Widespread Panic and Neutral Milk Hotel. Now he’s entered the fashion realm as the creative force behind Helm Boots’ redesign. This spring, the Austin, Texas-based brand unveiled a new logo, website, packaging, store signage and point-of-sale materials.

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  • In what promises to be one of our most random playlists (yes, even surpassing the dirty secrets one), the AP editorial team is reflecting this week on the first music videos we ever saw. Some of our picks are older than us and downright ridiculous when you revisit them in a modern context—and that’s the beauty and hilarity of it all.

    I can confidently say that Green Day were the vessel for my first music-meets-video experience, with their explosive 2004 single, “American Idiot.” My 10-year old self was enthralled by frontman Billie Joe Armstrong’s seemingly imperturbable punk-rock persona

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